eBook

Demanding Water

A Sociospatial Approach to Domestic Water Use in Mexico City

Megacities and Global Change / Megastädte und globaler Wandel
Band 22

1. Edition
(2017)
274 Pages, 21 schw.-w. Abb., 15 schw.-w. Tab., 2 schw.-w. Fotos
ISBN 978-3-515-11686-2 (Print)
ISBN 978-3-515-11690-9 (eBook)

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https://elibrary.steiner-verlag.de/book/99.105010/9783515116909

In the essentially water-rich basin of Mexico City, water taps are now installed in most homes. Yet in many of the city’s poorer neighborhoods in particular, water is supplied intermittently and taps often remain dry. How does such a socially constructed water scarcity affect water-related everyday practices in the home? And what is the relation between urban space and domestic practices of water use? In this study, Anke Schwarz employs a sociospatial approach which infuses Pierre Bourdieu’s Theory of Practice with a relational understanding of space. She draws upon in-depth interviews with 53 residents of Mexico City’s Federal District, taking subjective experience as a starting point, and adds a historical angle through the instrument of habitat biographies.

With respect to the pressing issue of urban water supply, Schwarz offers a fresh perspective to urban geography by placing an emphasis on a sociospatial approach on the micro scale. She demonstrates how water use can be a demanding everyday task even in cities where virtually all dwellings do have water taps. Rooftop tanks and jugs of bottled water are only the most visible tokens of the differences made by such supply limitations.


Keywords: Bottled water, Consumption, Gender, Habitat biography, Mexico City, Mujeres, Poverty, Social inequality, Sociospatial, Urban Studies, Urban infrastructure, Woman

Anke Schwarz
Anke Schwarz studied Urban Planning in Hamburg and Vienna, and obtained a PhD in Urban Geography from University of Hamburg in 2016. Between 2006 and 2014, her extensive research on Mexico City was supported by scholarships from the Heinrich Böll Foundation. Schwarz specializes in the social production of space and territory, the spatialization of social inequalities, urban infrastructures, and everyday practices.

  • Abstract7-9
  • Kurzfassung der Arbeit9-11
  • Resumen11-13
  • ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS13-15
  • CONTENTS15-17
  • ABBREVIATIONS17-19
  • 1. INTRODUCTION19-29
  • 2. THEORETICAL FRAMEWORK29-53
    • 2.1 Discussion of concepts29-36
    • 2.2 Habitus: the Incorporation of society36-43
    • 2.3 A sociospatial Approach to everyday Practices43-53
  • 3. RESEARCH DESIGN53-65
    • 3.1 Research Strategy53-55
    • 3.2 Empirical Methods55-65
  • 4. THE URBAN LANDSCAPE OF WATER SUPPLY AND WATER CONSUMPTION IN MEXICO CITY65-110
    • 4.1. Sociospatial Patterns of Water Supply in Mexico City66-95
    • 4.2 Contextualization: Water in Iztapalapa and Cuauhtémoc95-110
  • 5. PRACTICES OF DOMESTIC WATER USE IN MEXICO CITY110-177
    • 5.1 Drinking: Ingesting Water111-138
    • 5.2 Hygiene and Cleaning: Technical Water and the Body138-148
    • 5.3 Storing Water: Synchronizing Rhythms of Supply and Use148-163
    • 5.4 Imagining Urban Water163-177
  • 6. HABITAT BIOGRAPHIES: THE BECOMING OF HABITUS FROM A SPATIAL PERSPECTIVE177-197
  • 7. PAST EXPERIENCES AND CURRENT PRACTICES197-206
    • 7.1 Stockpiling Water and Past197-200
    • 7.2 Reusing Water and Past200-202
    • 7.3 Imagining Water and Past202-206
  • 8. REFLECTION ON THE SODIOSPATIAL CHARACTER OF DOMESTIC WAtER USE206-235
    • 8.1 A Predominance of the Actual206-213
    • 8.2 Inscribing Meaning through Spatial Practice213-215
    • 8.3 A Symbol of Mistrust?215-223
    • 8.4 Reflection on Research Strategy223-229
    • 8.5 Open Tasks for Future Research229-235
  • 9. REFLECTION ON THE RELATION BETWEEN HAbITAT AND HABITUS235-248
    • 9.1 Reflection on the Conceptual Approach235-242
    • 9.2 Habitat Biographies: Methodological Reflection242-248
  • 10. CONCLUDING REMARKS248-255
  • REFERENCES255--1